Posts Tagged ‘water flask bottle’

Rugby league positions

August 11th, 2017

A rugby league football team consists of thirteen players on the field, with four substitutes on the bench. Each of the thirteen players is assigned a position based on both the role they are expected to fill within the team and the area they typically occupy on the field. These positions are defined by number and are standardised across all teams and matches, however the same rules apply equally to all players regardless of position and the positions are fluid, meaning players free to interchange between positions or take up a different position at any time. In practice, the positions simply serve as a guideline as to the player’s expected role in both attack and defence.

Players are divided into two general categories, forwards and backs. Forwards are generally chosen for their size and strength. They are expected to run with the ball, to attack, and to make tackles. Forwards are required to improve the team’s field position thus creating space and time for the backs. Backs are usually smaller and faster, though a big, fast player can be of advantage in the backs. Their roles require speed and ball-playing skills, rather than just strength, to take advantage of the field position gained by the forwards. Typically forwards tend to operate in the centre of the field, while backs operate nearer to the touch-lines, where more space can usually be found.

The laws of the game recognise standardised numbering of positions. The starting side normally wear the numbers corresponding to their positions, only changing in the case of substitutions and position shifts during the game water flask bottle. In some competitions, such as Super League, players receive a squad number to use all season, no matter what positions they play in.

The positions and the numbers are defined by the game’s laws as:

There are seven backs, numbered 1 to 7. For these positions, the emphasis is on speed and ball-handling skills. Generally, the “back line” consists of smaller, more agile players.

Numbered 1, the fullback’s primary role is the last line of defence, standing behind the main line of defenders. Defensively, fullbacks must be able to chase and tackle any player who breaks the first line of defence, and must be able to catch and return kicks made by the attacking side. Their role in attack is usually as a support player, and they are often used to come into the line to create an overlap in attack. Fullbacks that feature in their respective nations’ rugby league halls of fame are France’s Puig Aubert tempered glass water bottle, Australia’s Clive Churchill, Charles Fraser, Graeme Langlands and Graham Eadie, Great Britain/Wales’ Jim Sullivan and New Zealand’s Des White.

There are four threequarters: two wingers and two centres. Right wing (2), right centre (3), left centre (4) and left wing (5). Typically these players work in pairs, with one winger and one centre occupying each side of the field.

Also known as wingers. There are two wingers in a rugby league team, numbered 2 and 5. The wingers are the players positioned closest to the touch-line on each side of the field. They are generally among the fastest players in a team, with the speed to exploit space that is created for them and finish an attacking move. In defence their primary role is the mark their opposing wingers, and they are also usually required to catch and return kicks made by an attacking team, often dropping behind the defensive line to help the fullback. Wingers that feature in their respective nations’ rugby league halls of fame are Great Britain’s Billy Batten, Australia’s Brian Bevan, John Ferguson, Ken Irvine, Harold Horder and Brian Carlson, South African Tom van Vollenhoven, Great Britain’s Billy Boston and Clive Sullivan and France’s Raymond Contrastin

There are two centres, right and left, numbered 3 and 4 respectively. They are usually positioned just inside the wingers and are typically the second-closest players to the touch-line on each side of the field. In attack their primary role is to provide an attacking threat out wide and as such they often need to be some of the fastest players on the pitch, often providing the pass for their winger to finish off a move. In defence, they are expected to mark their opposite centre insulated glass bottle. Centres that feature in their respective nations’ rugby league halls of fame are France’s Max Rousié, England’s Eric Ashton, Harold Wagstaff and Neil Fox, Wales’ Gus Risman and Australia’s Reg Gasnier, H “Dally” Messenger, Dave Brown, Jim Craig, Bob Fulton and Mal Meninga.

There are two halves. Positioned more centrally in attack, beside or behind the forwards, they direct the ball and are usually the team’s main play-makers, and as such are typically required to be the most skillful and intelligent players on the team.

Numbered 6, the stand off or five-eighth is usually responsible for directing the ball to the rest of the team in attack (hence the nickname ‘pivot’) and is often a strong passer and runner. Often this player is referred to as “second receiver”, as in attacking situations they are typically the second player to receive the ball (after the half back) and are then able to execute an attacking move.

Numbered 7, the scrum-half or half back is usually involved in directing the team’s play. The position is sometimes referred to as “first receiver”, as half backs are often positioned so as to be the first to receive the football from the dummy-half after a play-the-ball and then pass it on to a teammate, starting an attacking move. This makes them important decision-makers in attack. A good half-back knows the structure in attack and is one of the most skilful attacking players in the team. This player is also usually required to provide the majority of in-play kicking for their team.

A rugby league forward pack consists of players who tend to be bigger and stronger than backs, and generally rely more on their strength and physical form to fulfil their roles than play-making skills. The forwards also traditionally formed and contested scrums, however in the modern game it is largely immaterial which players pack down in the scrum. Despite this, forwards are still typically referred to by the position they would traditionally take in the scrum.

The front row of the scrum traditionally included the hooker with the two props on either side

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. All three may be referred to as front-rowers, but this term is now most commonly just used as a colloquialism to refer to the props.

The hooker, numbered 9, traditionally packs in the middle of the scrum’s front row. The position is named because of the traditional role of “hooking” the ball back with the foot when it enters the scrum. It is usually the hooker who plays in the dummy-half position, receiving the ball from the play-the-ball and continuing his team’s attack by passing the ball to a teammate or by running himself. As such, hookers are required to be among the most reliable passers on the team and often possess a similar skill-set to half backs.

There are two props, numbered 8 and 10, who pack into the front row of the scrum on either side of the hooker. Sometimes called “bookends” in Australasia, the props are often the largest and heaviest players on a team. In attack, their size and strength means that they are primarily used for running directly into the defensive line, as a kind of “battering ram” to simply gain metres. Similarly, props are relied upon to defend against such running from the opposition’s forwards. Prop forwards that feature in their respective nations’ rugby league halls of fame are Australia’s Arthur Beetson, Duncan Hall and Frank Burge, and New Zealand’s Cliff Johnson.

Three forwards make up the back row of the scrum; two-second-rowers and a lock forward. All three may be referred to as back-rowers.

Second-row forwards are numbered 11 and 12. While their responsibilities are similar in many ways to the props, these players typically possess more speed and agility and take up a wider position in attack and defence. Often each second rower will cover a specific side of the field, working in unison with their respective centre and winger. Second rowers typically provide a more direct attacking threat, and are often relied upon to perform large amounts of tackles in defence. Second-row forwards that feature in their respective nations’ rugby league halls of fame are New Zealand’s Mark Graham, Australia’s Norm Provan, George Treweek and Harry Bath, France’s Jean Galia, Great Britain & England’s Martin Hodgson.

Numbered 13, the loose forward or lock forward packs behind the two-second-rows in the scrum. The loose forward is somewhat of a utility role; some teams may choose to simply deploy a third prop, while other teams may use a more skilful player in this position as an additional playmaker. Loose forwards that feature in their respective nations’ rugby league halls of fame are Great Britain’s Ellery Hanley, Australia’s Ron Coote, John Raper and Wally Prigg, Great Britain’s Vince Karalius and ‘Rocky’ Turner, and New Zealand’s Charlie Seeling.

In addition to the thirteen on-field players, there are a maximum of four substitute players who start the game on their team’s bench. Usually, they will be numbered 14, 15, 16 and 17. Each player normally keeps their number for the whole game, regardless of which position they play in. That is, if player number 14 replaces the fullback, he will wear the number 14 for the whole game, and not change shirts to display the number 1.

The rules governing if and when a replacement can be used have varied over the history of the game; currently they can be used for any reason by their coach – typically because of injury, to manage fatigue, for tactical reasons or due to poor performance. Under current rules, players who have been substituted are typically allowed to be substituted back into the game later on. Leagues in different countries have had different rules on how many interchanges can be made in a game. England’s Super League allows up to ten interchanges per team in each game. Commencing in the 2016 season, Australia’s National Rugby League permits up to eight interchanges per team per game. Additionally, if a player is injured due to foul play and an opposition player is put on “report” then his team is given a free interchange.

Often an interchange bench will include at least one (and usually two) replacement props, as it is generally considered to be the most physically taxing position and these players are likely to tire the quickest.

As well as their positions, players’ roles may be referred to by a range of other terms.

Following a tackle, the defending team may position two players – known as markers – at the play-the-ball to stand, one behind the other facing the tackled player and the attacking team’s dummy-half.

The dummy half or acting half is the player who stands behind the play-the-ball and collects the ball, before passing, running or kicking the ball. The hooker has become almost synonymous with the dummy half role. However, any player of any position can play the role at any time and this often happens during a game, particularly when the hooker is the player tackled.

The first receiver is the name given to the first player to receive the ball off the ruck, i.e. from the dummy-half.

If the ball is passed immediately by the first receiver, then the player catching it is sometimes referred to as the second receiver.

A player who can play in a number of different positions is often referred to as a “utility player”, “utility forward”, or “utility back”.

Although any player can attempt his team’s kicks at goal (penalty kicks or conversions), most teams will have specific players who will train extensively at kicking, and will often use only one player to take goal kicks during a game.

The captain is the on-field leader of a team and a point of contact between the referee and a team, and can be a player of any position. Some of the captain’s responsibilities are stipulated in the laws.

Before a match, the two teams’ captains toss a coin with the referee. The captain that wins the toss can decide to kick off or can choose which end of the field to defend. The captain that loses the toss then takes the other of the alternatives.

The captain is often seen as responsible for a team’s discipline. When a team persistently breaks the laws, the referee while issuing a caution will often speak with the team’s captain to encourage them to improve their team’s discipline.

The captains are also traditionally responsible for appointing a substitute should a referee suffer an injury during a game, although in the professional game there are other procedures in place for dealing with this.

Johan af Puke

July 28th, 2017

Johan af Puke (født 27. februar 1751, død 21 retro jerseys soccer. april 1816) var en svensk sjøoffiser, med graden generaladmiral i 1812, han var også En af rikets herrar.

Johan Puke ble født i Ronneby, hans foreldre var kaptein i hollandsk tjeneste water flask bottle, Johan Puke og Maria Regina Branting, datter til major Johan Branting og Regina Elisabeth Klöfverfelt. Hans far ble dømt til døden og henrettet for å ha deltatt i kuppet 1756 som ble forsøkt gjennomført for å øke den regjerende kong Adolf Fredrik av Sveriges makt. Moren og den farløse sønnen levde deretter i stor nød. Knapt ti år gammel ble han innskrevet ved Skeppsgossekåren i Karlskrona. Han var første gang til sjøs elleve år gammel. Fire år etter «karlskrevs» han (ble ansett utlært som sjøgutt) og fortsatte sin tjeneste i Flottan som kofferdibåtsman ved schoutbynachten Johan Rajalins kompani.

I 1770 gikk Puke først i hollandsk, så britisk tjeneste. I 1774 kom han tilbake til Sverige og i 1777 ble han utnevnt til løytnant i Flottan. Etter en kort periode i fransk tjeneste så avseilte han i 1784 som skipssjef på fregatten «Sprengtporten» for Saint-Barthélemy, en øy i fransk vest-india som Sverige hadde overtatt. Ombord var Salomon von Rajalin, nyutnevnt kommandant for den nye kolonien.

I 1785 ble han major, og i den russisk-svenske krig (1788–1790) deltok han ombord i fregatten «Freja» i slaget ved Hogland. Senere deltok han som øversteløytnant ombord på linjeskipet «Dristigheten» i slaget ved Øland.

Den 3. juli 1790 hadde den svenske flåten blitt innesperret på reden ved Viborg i Finskebukten. Gustav III tilkalte Puke og ba han lede et utbruddsforsøk mot den overlegne russiske flåten. Kongen sa: «Kära Puke ni är min flottas ledare, er fader vägrade ej att räcka huvudet för min far, spara ej ert liv och mod för mig jag glömmer det ej!» På dette svarte af Puke: «Ja, Ers majestät glass water filter bottle, nog fan går jag ut, men hur det går med de andra det får vi se.». Utbruddet, senere kjent som Viborgska gatloppet, lyktes, men til en høy pris.

I 1793 avanserte han til kommandør og i 1794 kontreadmiral, viseadmiral i 1802, befalhavende admiral i Karlskrona i 1803, admiral i 1808 og i 1809 overadmiral buy football socks online. I 1797 ble han adlet som af Puke.

Mot slutten av finskekrigen fikk af Puke i juli 1809 kommando over Västerbottenekspedisjonen, i 1812 ble han utnevnt til generaladmiral og statsråd og i 1813 generaladjutant for flottorna. Samme år ble han beordret til å sørge for vestkystens sjøforsvar og lede flottans operasjoner, hvilket han gjorde hvor han i 1814 deltok i felttoget mot Norge.

Johan af Puke tok avskjed fra statsrådsembetet i 1815 og avled i 1816 i Karlskrona.

Ibrahim Biçakçiu

July 18th, 2017

Ibrahim Aqif Bej Biçakçiu (auch bekannt als Ibrahim Biçaku, * 10. September 1905 in Elbasan, Osmanisches Reich; † 4. Januar 1977 in Elbasan water flask bottle, Albanien) war ein albanischer Agronom und vom 29. August bis zum 28. November 1944 Ministerpräsident Albaniens im Zweiten Weltkrieg unter deutscher Besatzung. Er war Mitglied der Balli Kombëtar bag for cell phone.

Ibrahim Aqif Bej Biçakçiu war der Sohn von Aqif Pascha Biçakçiu von Elbasan. Wie seine Familie war er Mitglied des Sufiordens der Bektaschi. Familienmitglieder halfen bei der Unabhängigkeitserklärung Albaniens im November 1912 mit best water backpack for running, so dass er mit dieser Ideologie und in diesem Glauben aufwuchs.

1943 unterstützte er zusammen mit Bedri Bej Pejani und Xhafer Deva bei der Gründung eines Nationalkomitees aus zweiundzwanzig albanischen und kosovoalbanischen Persönlichkeiten, welches Albanien für unabhängig erklärte und ein Exekutivkomitee wählte, um eine vorläufige Regierung zu bilden meat jaccard. Nach einwöchigen Verhandlungen erklärte sich Ibrahim Biçakçiu im Sommer 1944 bereit, eine neue und kleine Regierung zu bilden. Vom 6. September 1944 bis zum 29. November 1944 war er zugleich Außenminister Albaniens.

Obwohl viele Mitglieder der Balli Kombëtar aus Albanien flohen, nachdem die Kommunisten im November 1944 die Macht übernommen hatten, entschied sich Ibrahim Bej Biçakçiu zu bleiben und erklärte, dass er lieber in seinem Geburtsland als auf fremdem Boden sterbe. Biçakçiu wurde im Jahre 1977 von den Kommunisten erschossen.

Коренцов, Александр Иванович

February 25th, 2017

4 августа 1913(1913-08-04)

Канск, Российская Империя

3 мая 1997(1997-05-03) (83 года)

Москва, Российская Федерация

Александр Иванович Коренцов (1913 – 1997) — график, живописец water flask bottle. Заслуженный художник РСФСР (1969)

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, заслуженный работник культуры Бурятской АССР (1975), член Союза художников СССР (1951).

Родился в Канске, Красноярский край. Учился в Свердловском художественном училище (1935–1937) и в студии рисунка при Академии архитектуры СССР (1940–1947).В станковой графике создал серию значительных композиций, посвященных образу Ленина и Крупской, много творческого внимания отдал теме Великой Отечественной войны и образу человека-труженика best belts. Является автором проектов оформления крупных выставок советских и зарубежных музеев:

Ветеран Великой Отечественной войны.

Americans for Peace Now

October 11th, 2016

Americans for Peace Now (APN) is a nonprofit organization based in the United States whose stated aim is to help achieve a comprehensive political settlement to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Founded in 1981 as the sister organization to Israel’s Shalom Achshav (Peace Now), APN describes itself as an independent, non-partisan, non-profit, pro-Israel, pro-peace, American Jewish organization. The current President and CEO of APN is Debra DeLee.

APN defines itself as “the leading voice of American Jews who support Israel and know that only peace will ensure Israel’s security, prosperity and continued viability as a Jewish water flask bottle, democratic state.” APN asserts that the “positions advocated for more than two decades by APN and Shalom Achshav – like calling for the evacuation of settlements and the creation of a viable Palestinian state – are now recognized by most American Jews and Israelis as basic requirements both for peace and for a secure future for Israel.”

APN’s describes the organization as “a non-partisan organization with a non-partisan mission.” According to APN, it supplies timely information and education, providing a pro-Israel, pro-peace, American Jewish perspective on issues and legislation. APN also engages in grassroots political activism and outreach to the American Jewish and Arab American communities, opinion leaders, university students and the public at large. We further promote our agenda through press releases, editorials and personal contacts with journalists, serving as a respected source of balanced information, analysis, and commentary.”

In 1978, 348 senior Israeli army officers wrote a letter to Prime Minister Menachem Begin calling for peace between Israel and Egypt. The letter stated, “the government policy, perpetuating its rule over a million Arabs, could harm the Jewish-democratic character of the state, and makes it difficult for us to identify with the task. Mindful of Israel’s security needs and the difficulties on the path to peace, we nevertheless consider that real security can be achieved only when we achieve peace.” This petition led to the creation of Shalom Achshav (Peace Now in Hebrew), a grassroots movement dedicated to raising public support for the peace process.

APN was founded in 1981 to support the activities of Shalom Achshav. APN’s activities have grown to include: media outreach and monitoring, government relations, and public outreach.

According to Americans for Peace Now, they are “the leading voice of American Jews who support Israel and know that only peace will ensure Israel’s security goalie gloves on sale, prosperity and continued viability as a Jewish design own football shirt, democratic state.” APN asserts that the “positions advocated for more than two decades by APN and Shalom Achshav – like calling for the evacuation of settlements and the creation of a viable Palestinian state – are now recognized by most American Jews and Israelis as basic requirements both for peace and for a secure future for Israel.”

APN’s describes them as “a non-partisan organization with a non-partisan mission.” According to APN, they supply timely information and education, providing a pro-Israel, pro-peace, American Jewish perspective on issues and legislation. APN also engages in grassroots political activism and outreach to the American Jewish and Arab American communities, opinion leaders, university students and the public at large. We further promote our agenda through press releases, editorials and personal contacts with journalists, serving as a respected source of balanced information, analysis, and commentary.”

APN is a member of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations.

The organization maintains an active website with information, commentary reproduction football shirts, and advocacy regarding current events in Israel, it sponsors and participates in public events, and it sends speakers to communities around the country to promote the cause of peace. APN publishes the , a weekly email newsletter on events in Israel and the Middle East which includes their and segments. APN also publishes , a daily news round-up. In 2011, APN released . In 2012, APN released in print and online. According to APN, They Say, We Say provides comprehensive responses to right-wing arguments concerning Israel and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. APN’s other frequently updated segments include and .

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